Molasses Biscuits Recipe – sweet and buttery

Sweet molasses scones sprinkled with crunchy sunflower seeds.

I love bakeries and cafes that display all of their goodies in baskets at the front counter.  It makes everything look more delicious and paralyzes my kids with indecision.

It’s a time for learning life lessons: I remind them that there are many kinds of hard choices in life and a choice means one, not two, even if you brought your own money.

 

Sweet molasses scones recipe sprinkled with crunchy sunflower seeds.

Stacking your own baked goods in a basket at the kitchen table is different though. You need only finish your soup to get a second. Or you need only have emptied your lunch bag to have a scone with butter and jam as an afterschool snack.

These are the kind of scones that go well with supper, alongside scrambled eggs and baked beans at breakfast or smeared with butter and jam in the afternoon. You could even make cheese sandwiches with them.

Don’t dismiss this molasses scones recipe because they have a wholesome earthy look. They’re sweet and buttery with a nice little crunch from the sunflower seeds.

 

Molasses Biscuits Recipe

Adapted from 150 Essential Whole Grain Recipes by the Canadian Living test kitchen

Makes 18 scones

  • 1 ¾ cups flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup toasted sunflower seeds, plus more for sprinkling
  • 2 ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ cup cold butter, cubed
  • 1 cup buttermilk or soured milk
  • ¼ cup Grandma Fancy Molasses
  • 1 egg, beaten
  1. In a large bowl whisk flour, baking powder, baking soda, sunflower seeds and salt.
  2. Cut in butter until it resembles coarse crumbs. (This can all be done by pulsing mixture in a food processor, carefully)
  3. In another bowl whisk together buttermilk, molasses and egg.
  4. Pour milk mixture into flour mixture and stir just enough to combine.
  5. Gather dough into a ball and on a lightly floured surface knead gently just until it comes together in a soft dough (4-5 times)
  6. Gently pat into a 7`by 10`rectangle and transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet.
  7. Score into nine squares. Score the squares on the diagonal to form triangles.
  8. Sprinkle with 2-3 Tbsp of sunflower seeds and gently press them in.
  9. Bake at 400 F for 20-25 minutes until golden and the centre no longer feels soft.
  10. Cool a few minutes before cutting.

If you’re looking for more molasses quick breads try whole wheat molasses quick bread or sweet molasses quick bread.

 

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Sweet molasses scones and wholesome and buttery

Whole wheat molasses oat scones

 Whole wheat molasses scones drizzled with a vanilla glaze

Whoever came up with the idea to glaze scones should be given a medal.

I have always considered scones their own food group and prefer them above all other breads. I could make a meal of scones actually, and did once years ago on a trip to Ireland.

whole wheat molasses oatmeal scones

After a daylong hike along a portion of the magical Wicklow Way that winds south from Dublin to Glendalough I fell asleep anticipating the next day’s treat: tea and scones on the lawn of a charming inn before we were to catch our lift back to Dublin.

(To give a little context, we were staying in hostels and eating on a backpacker’s budget. Tea and scones on the sunny lawn of a lovely inn was like going to the spa.)

whole wheat oatmeal molasses scones with vanilla glaze

The Irish scones did not disappoint and that was my lunch for the day. Scone, after scone, after scone, with a little jam and butter.

Now to dress these molasses oat scones with a drizzle of icing is something new to me. It turns them into little cakes which is a lovely treat.

 

Whole wheat molasses oat scones

Adapted from Union Street Eats who adapted it from Barefoot Contessa who perhaps adapted it from I’m not sure who. That’s the beauty of recipes as they make the rounds.

  • 1 ¾ cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • ¾ cups flour
  • ½ cup rolled oats
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup cold butter, cut into pieces
  • ¼ cup milk
  • ¼ cup Grandma Fancy Molasses
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 beaten egg for egg wash (optional)

Frosting

  • 1/2 cup icing sugar
  • 3 Tbsp Grandma Fancy Molasses
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla

 

  1. Combine dry ingredients in a food processor and pulse to combine.
  2. Add cold butter and pulse until mixture resembles fine meal (you want there to be little chunks of butter left.)
  3. Remove to a good sized bowl.
  4. In a separate bowl beat eggs, milk and molasses together and add to dry mixture.
  5. Stir gently until just combined.
  6. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead gentlya few times until the dough comes together. (Work the dough as little as possible so your scones are light).
  7. Roll out (don’t press too hard) about an inch thick and cut into shapes.
  8. Place them on a parchment paper lined baking sheet and brush with egg wash.
  9. Bake at 400 F for 20-25 minutes.
  10. Remove to a rack to cool.

To make glaze:

  1. Whisk icing sugar and molasses together.
  2. Add vanilla and spread or drizzle over scones.

If you’re a fan of scones you might like molasses walnut scones with vanilla glaze  

For light scones pulse the dry mixture and cold butter until the dough resembles coarse meal with pebbly bits of butter:For light textured scones pulse the flour and cold butter until the dough resembles coarse meal

Work the dough as little as possible so little chunks of butter remain:  Work the dough as little as possible so little chunks of butter remain.

 

 

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Molasses walnut scones recipe with vanilla glaze

molasses walnut scones with vanilla glaze

I consider scones the perfect snack food. There’s something about the texture that I find satisfying and comforting and they can be filling enough if made with good flour (whole grain). This molasses walnut scones recipe takes scones to a whole new level with a generous handful of nuts and sweet glaze. Just right for a mid-morning snack but even better eaten warm from the oven on a weekend morning.

Molasses walnut scones

I learned the art of scone and biscuit making from my mom who I doubt ever made a brick of a bread in her entire life.

The secret — use icy cold butter and work the dough as gently and as little as possible.

This brings to mind the story of a friend in high school who brought her first attempt at biscuits to a party. They were tough and heavy and we ended up taking turns chucking them off the back deck in a contest to see whose would go the furthest and if they’d smash into smithereens or land with a thud.  (Don’t feel sorry for her. She went on to become quite accomplished at all things baking and cooking).

Molasses walnut scones recipe with vanilla glaze

Adapted from Food & Drink magazine, Winter 2011 issue

  • 2 cups flour (use half whole grain flour)
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1 ½ tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ¼ cup cold butter
  • ¾ cup + 2 Tbsp. milk
  • 2 Tbsp. Grandma Fancy Molasses
  • ¾ cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
  • Glaze:
  • ½ cup icing sugar
  • 1-2 Tbsp. cream
  • ½ t vanilla
  • ¼ cup walnuts, finely chopped
  1. Preheat oven to 425 F.
  2. Combine dry ingredients and cut in butter with a pastry blender or two knives.
  3. Combine milk and molasses, mix well and add to dry mixture along with the walnuts .
  4. Stir gently just until the dough comes together.
  5. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. (This is a very light and sticky dough but resist the urge to add more flour. Keeping with the flour proportions and working the dough as little as possible creates the most beautifully soft scone.)
  6. Divide dough in half and pat each half into a 1” thick disk, fold it over on itself to create a half-moon, then fold it over again. Gently pat into a 1” thick disk, cut into 6 wedges.
  7. Place on a parchment-lined cookie sheet at least 1”apart.
  8. Bake 10-12 minutes.
  9. Remove from oven and coat with glaze while still warm. Sprinkle with finely chopped walnuts. Serve warm.

If you love scones as much as I do (and glazed scones at that) you might like to try whole wheat molasses oatmeal scones.

 

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Grandma’s biscuits with molasses

fluffy biscuits with molasses
Our family recipe for biscuits was passed down from my great grandmother but how far back it really goes we don’t know. It’s one of those recipes that has just always been around. Mom said Ila (my grandmother) wasn’t one to make homemade bread but there were always biscuits. Ila called them Momma’s biscuits, because she grew up eating them too.

My grandmother used a glass to cut her biscuits into rounds and she sprinkled them with sugar before baking when they were to be used with shortcake. Sometimes she used a small shortbread cookie cutter to make mini biscuits that she’d fill with egg salad for one-bite sandwiches. And sometimes they’d eat them hot out of the oven with butter and molasses.

They’re a flakey biscuit and unusual in that they call for 8tsp of baking powder (that’s not a typo).  You can adapt the recipe to sweet or savourydishes by playing with the amount of sugar. For shortcake use 3-4 Tbsp ofsugar, to eat alongside a meal use 1-2 Tbsp. The recipe works well with allsorts of flours too (whole wheat, spelt, whole white, kamut or conventionalwhite flour.)

The key to flakiness is to not work the dough too much(little pebbles of hard butter are good), roll out the dough gently, don’ttwist the cutter as you’re pushing it through the dough and don’t pat yourbiscuits down (something I taught my kids as they learned to make these at myside).

 

Grandma’s Biscuits

  • 3 ½ cups flour
  • 2-4 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 8 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup butter, very cold and cut into pieces
  • 1 1/3 cups milk, soured with 1 Tbsp fruit vinegar

Combine the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in abowl. Cut in the butter with a pastry blender or two knives until it’spea-sized. Make a well in the center and pour in the milk. Stir gently with afork until the dough just comes together (there will still be flour in thebottom of the bowl). Scrape the dough onto a lightly-floured counter – leftoverflour and all – and knead until it just comes together (no more than 10 times).Roll out gently until it’s about an inch thick.

Cut into desired shapes.

Arrange on a parchment-lined cookie sheet and bake at 400F for 12-15 minutes. Spread with butter and drizzle with Grandma Fancy Molasses!

 

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